An economist working at the University of Buffalo recently expressed the opinion that older women should receive a distinct designation in the workforce that is based on both their age and gender. This news has caught the attention of Michigan residents who are concerned with protecting older women from workplace discrimination.

The assistant professor of economics explains that the present age discrimination laws have not proven very effective at protecting women from age-related discrimination. The assistant professor says enforcing these laws is critical in the fight against workplace injustices as well as facilitating continued viability of the social security system.

The continued aging of the American population means that the ratio of workers to retirees is in decline. This adds pressure to the social security system that could one day threaten its solvency. One way to combat this problem is to ensure that older women who want to work are able to secure employment.

The Age Discrimination Act of 1967 and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act are both part of laws intended to promote equal opportunity for employment. The ADEA makes it illegal to deny older Americans the opportunity to work and Title VII outlaws discrimination based on gender. The problem is that courts do not allow these two laws to be combined in a case that involves discrimination. The plaintiff has to claim either age or gender discrimination independently.

This situation has left many people with the belief that current laws protect the employment opportunities for older men but do very little for older women faced with dual discrimination.

Older workers in America possess the same right to work and advance in the career of their choice as younger individuals. An individual who has been disqualified from employment or passed over for promotion because of their age may benefit from speaking to an employment lawyer regarding their legal options.